• Send Us a Message
  • Atlanta Botanical Garden - The Best Gardening Park to Visit in the USA

    Atlanta Botanical Garden  - The Best Gardening Park to Visit in the USA
    Step into a world of magic and serenity at the Atlanta Botanical Garden, where features like the Fuqua Orchid Center treat visitors to a rare collection of high-elevation orchids never before grown in the southeast.

    CLICK HERE to learn more about the Atlanta Botanical Garden
    CLICK HERE to download the Free January-December Best Practices for a Healthy Garden Checklist
    CLICK HERE to learn about how VIVIDMax Grip Clogs should fit
    CLICK HERE to learn about how to wear the VIVIDMax Grip Straps
    CLICK HERE to learn about how to clean the VIVIDMax Grip Clogs
    Click here to download the printable PDF

    January - December 2022 Best Practices For Healthy Garden Checklist

    Credit: University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources

    January Checklist

      • Pull weeds brought on by recent rains now before they go to seed.
    • This is a good time to plant dormant fruit trees and roses.
    • Top dress tender plants with a mulch mix
    • Keep the garden clean. Prune and cut back overgrown perennials, roses, and shrubs.
    • Remove plants that haven't been doing well to make room for healthier ones.
    • Protect plants from frosty nights. Cover them and keep them watered.
    • Indoors, heaters can dry out houseplants quickly. Don't forget to keep them watered.
    • Feed the birds in your garden.
    • Start artichoke, asparagus, rhubarb.
    1. Fiskars Ergo Garden Tool Set

    These are three of the most essential of all gardening tools. And they come packaged together in a convenient, economical set. It includes a garden trowel for excavating shallow holes and trenches, a three-tine cultivator for loosening up hard soil, and a measured transplanting trowel for digging holes to precise depths, which is especially important when planting bulbs.

    Other gardening toolsets to consider buying:

     

    February Checklist

    • Now is the time to plant potatoes, garlic, onions, rhubarb, and asparagus.
    • Finish pruning roses, shrubs, and trees. After pruning, be sure to clean your tools.
    • Prune and cut back perennials & ornamental grasses.
    • Prune lavender back to emerging new growth for best spike production this coming summer.
    • Pack your luggage for your honeymoon
    • Shop now for citrus trees.
    • Continue to clean up winter debris from beds and containers.
    • If starting tomatoes from seed, now is the time to start them indoors.
    • Divide perennials such as daylily and yarrow. Re-plant them in bare spots around your garden.
    2. Martha Stewart Hori-Hori Knife

    A great garden knife can handle a lot of chores, from digging to slicing through roots and chopping weeds. A hori-hori is a lightweight tool with a stainless-steel blade and a full tang (that is, the stainless steel extends into the handle so the blade won't bend or break). One edge of the blade is serrated for sawing, and the other is razor-sharp for cutting. It even comes with a leather sheath for storage.

    Other gardening knifes to consider buying:

    3. Magid Glove & Safety Handmaster Rose Pruning Gardening Gloves

    If you’re new to gardening, you might not consider gloves an essential tool, but your hands most certainly will. The gloves are made of synthetic leather that’s puncture-resistant and much more supple and comfortable than animal leather. The elbow-length gauntlet cuff shields your wrists and forearms from injury, and extra padding is provided across the knuckles and fingertips.

    Other gardening gloves to consider buying: 

    4. Felco Ergonomic Hand Pruner

    Swiss-made Felco pruners keep your landscape on the cutting edge. The long-lasting steel blade can be re-sharpened or replaced, and other replacement parts are widely available. The pruners make clean, smooth cuts up to one inch in diameter.

    Other gardening hand pruner to consider buying: 

    March Checklist

      • Feed your garden with organic all-purpose plant fertilizer.
        • This is the best time to shop for rhododendrons and azaleas. Then feed them after they have flowered with organic azalea/camellia/gardenia fertilizer.
            • Continue to prepare planting beds for spring. Turn the soil and add at least 4 inches of compost. Test your soil for pH, nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium and add the appropriate fertilizer or supplement.
            • If you planted fava beans as a cover crop in your garden, pull up the plants when half of the blooms have opened. This will give you the greatest return of nitrogen to your soil.
            • Feed citrus trees this month with granular citrus fertilizer.
            • Plant vegetable starts.
          • Check the nurseries for blooming and budding annuals for spring.
          • Plant gladiolus and dahlias for summer color.
          • Consider planting companion plants to provide an environment that welcomes beneficial insects. Choose cosmos, marigolds, nasturtiums, sunflowers, and zinnias to attract bees.
          • If you must water, do so early in the morning to prevent wet foliage at night. Wet foliage attracts snails and fungal diseases.
          • 5.
        Muck Boot Women's Muckster Ii Mid Ankle Boot

        Gardening can quickly wreak havoc on your shoes, and getting a pair of waterproof boots will save you heartache in the long run. A love for gardening can now extend comfortably into the winter with these warm muckster ii designs.

        Other gardening boots to consider buying:

        6. Cate's Garden Hand Weeder

        For tackling a lot of weeding, the least fun but necessary chore of gardening, you'll want this tool that makes it easier. Constructed of an ash wood handle and rust-resistant stainless steel, this hand weeder makes it easy to get weeds on the first try thanks to the V-shaped fork tip and curved base that allows for better leverage.

        Other garden hand weeders to consider buying:

        7. Bully Tools Heavy Duty Sidewalk and Ice Scraper

        In the wintertime, you use an ice chipper to chip away at any ice that builds up on your steps, sidewalk, or driveway. But you can also use the steel chipping head to dig a garden bed by pushing it through the grass and down into the dirt around the perimeter of the square you want to dig. Then you can easily pry the square up to reveal the dirt beneath.

        Other gardening ice chippers to consider buying: 

        8. Japanese Hand Garden Hoe

        The Japanese Hand Garden Hoe is sharpened on both sides to make gardening chores quick and easy. This tool removes grass, weeds and works especially well when weeding under mulch.

        Other garden hoe's to consider buying: 

        9. Tracey Garden Smart Shovel

        It has a commercial-grade, 14-gauge tempered steel blade and a virtually indestructible fiberglass handle reinforced with steel. But what makes this shovel unique is the built-in soil grater conveniently positioned at the base of the handle.

        Other garden shovels to consider buying: 

        BONUS

         

        April Checklist

          • Prune back herbaceous perennials (example: salvia), to promote plant bushiness.
          • Plant edibles like lettuce, tomatoes, herbs, zucchini, and berries. Soybean, corn, cucumber, melon, and winter squash seeds directly into the ground. Consider a soaker hose to conserve water in your vegetable garden.
          • Transplant tomato seedlings: Pinch off all but the top two pairs of leaves and set the seedling into a deep hole. Backfill, keeping the top leaves above soil.
          • Work your cover crops into the soil before they seed.
          • Don’t use insecticides in your garden – you may be harming bees and beneficial insects that actually help control aphids, mites, whiteflies, and other garden pests.
          • Remove aphids from plants with a strong stream of water.
          • Handpick snails and slugs or use non-toxic slug bait.
        • Start planting summer annuals like lobelia, begonia, marigolds, cosmos, petunias, snapdragon, and alyssum.
        • Plant gladiolus, dahlias & lilies for summer blooms.

        May Checklist

          • Plant late summer edibles such as pumpkins, squash, sunflowers, peppers, basil, and melons.
          • Release ladybugs and other beneficial insects to help control aphids, mites, whiteflies, and other garden pests.
          • Let self-seeding annuals go to seed instead of deadheading. New seedlings will appear for another crop of summer flowers.
          • Keep your strawberry crop clean by spreading bark mulch around the plants, lifting the flowers and leaves above the mulch. This will also reduce watering needs and cut down on weeds.
        • Harvest radishes when the crown begins to show above the soil. Avoid “split” radishes by going easy on the watering.
        • If you've planted new potatoes, dig them as soon as the plants begin to bloom. Start by gently bringing up the soil with a pitchfork about a foot away from the plant; separate out the tubers by hand.
        • Read how to improve your garden soil with organic matter.
        • Learn about beneficial insects – the ones you should encourage to stay in your garden (and why).

        June Checklist

        • This is a good time to plant beans, corn, cucumbers, eggplant, peppers, pumpkins (start now for Halloween), summer squash, and tomatoes. These warm-season plants need lots of irrigation: take this into consideration and plant only as many as you need and can water consistently all summer.
        • Check the irrigation system: Turn on the irrigation system and inspect sprinklers to see if they're working properly. Replace any broken heads; clean out clogged ones. To readjust a head that is misaligned, rotate the head until it sprays in the right direction.
        • Feed tomato plants with a low-nitrogen fertilizer when the fruit starts to develop; too much nitrogen encourages more foliage and less fruit. Mulch the tomato plants to conserve moisture.

        July Checklist

          • Grow herb seedlings in well-draining soil in a location getting 4-to-6 hours of sun.
          • For tomato plants that produce large slicing tomatoes, thinning fruit will encourage plants to produce larger tomatoes. This will also reduce the weight on fragile branches.
          • Water mature trees deeply during this drought.
          • To get the most blooms on dahlias, cut back the center stems; this will encourage more lateral branches.
        • Garlic is ready to harvest when leaves begin to turn yellow and die back. Shake off the dirt and store them in a cool, dry place. When the bulbs are dry (3 to 4 weeks), clean with a soft brush, cut off the stems and roots, and store in a cool dark place.
        • Cactus and succulents are drought tolerant, but many appreciate some water in very hot weather. Also, succulents may find full sun to be too strong in some locations, so provide them with some shade if they appear to be struggling.
        • Mulch garden and vegetable beds to protect them from summer heat, reduce watering needs, and keep the weeds down.
        • Got whiteflies? Control them with sticky traps, increase air circulation by thinning out dense branches and/or foliage, and use earth worm castings to discourage them.
        • "Deadheading" faded flowers encourages new blooms.

        HALFWAY CHECKPOINT

        • Give yourself a clap on your back for making it to July!

         

        August Checklist

        • Maintain drip irrigation for most effective water use: check for leaks or missing/broken emitters.
        • Begin sowing seeds for cool-season crops, such as beets, turnips, cabbage, radishes, broccoli, peas, kale, collard, spinach, arugula, and lettuces.
        • Water container-grown citrus trees once a week, or more often if the weather turns hot.
        • Remove runners from strawberries to promote buds for next year, and to have a stronger mother plant.
        • Plan your vegetable garden for crop rotation to avoid re-planting the same types of plants in the same area two seasons in a row.
        • Prune fruit trees to control height, maintain shape and eliminate suckers.

        September Checklist

          • In our area, this is a good time to start planting bulbs for spring.
          • Plant garlic cloves, 2 inches deep and 3-to-6 inches apart.
          • There is still time to plant cool-season vegetables. See a list of good candidates in August.
          • As you pull up veggie plants that are no longer producing, compost only those that show no sign of disease.
        • Plant colorful fall flowers: Pansies, Violas, Mums, Stock, Snapdragons, Iceland Poppies and Cyclamen.
        • Fertilize azaleas, camellias and rhododendrons with fertilizer for acid-loving plants.
        • As fruit grows on second-year growth, cut back fruited canes of raspberries, leaving new canes for fruiting next year.

        October Checklist

        • Feed hydrangeas with acidifier for bluer blooms. Feed with agricultural lime to turn them pink.
        • Plant bulbs now for spring blooms.
        • Fall is a great time to plant natives.
        • Plant garlic and shallots now for a summer harvest.
        • Prepare planting beds for winter: clear out weeds and rocks. Add soil amendments and/or plant winter cover crops such as fava beans to replace nitrogen in the soil.
        • Add fallen leaves and plant debris to your compost pile. Or, leave them on the ground to serve as a natural mulch for your garden.

        November Checklist

          • Weather permitting, many of the October Garden activities can continue into November.
          • There's still time for fall planting of shrubs, trees, and perennials before the winter rains arrive (we hope!) Winter rains will help the new plantings to establish good root systems.
          • Cool-season vegetable seedlings can be planted: cabbage, kale, chard, spinach for example. Also, carrots may be seeded now.
        • Remove dead or diseased limbs from trees and shrubs.
        • If you are putting away your garden tools for the winter, first give them a good cleaning. Rub with alcohol after each use to prevent the spread of disease. Prevent rust with a light coating of lubricant grease (such as lithium grease). Shovels and saws may be stored in a bucket of sand with a little oil (5 parts sand to 1 part oil).
        • Control slugs and snails with an organic, pet/animal- and food-safe slug bait.

        December Checklist

        • Indoors, keep holiday greens well-watered or mist daily. Keep trees and greens away from hot sunny windows and heat sources. Poinsettias should be kept away from heat sources. If you’re using poinsettias to decorate outdoors, bring them in out of the cold at night.
        • December is still a great time to plant perennials, shrubs, and trees to get roots established which will promote lush spring growth.
        • Keep an eye out for frost warnings. Be prepared to cover with frost Blanket for protection. Note: remove frost blankets during the daytime hours. Keep plants watered during this time.
        • Now is a good time to plant chilled tulip bulbs. Chilled bulbs may grow taller with larger flowers than non-chilled bulbs.
        • Clean up the garden – remove excessive leaf litter, etc. – to avoid over-wintering diseases.
        • Sow wildflowers seeds now for instant spring color.
        • Start planning your spring garden now!

        Top 26 Must Haves Essential Gardening Tools | Top Rated and Reviewed

        This post may contain affiliate links, which means we receive a commission if you purchase through our link, at no extra cost to you. Please read full disclosure here.

        There are certain tools that every amateur horticulturist finds to be essential. There are so many tools and tricks to consider that it can be difficult to remember everything. So, to help you find the best tools for all of your upcoming gardening projects, we asked experienced gardeners about the gloves, boots, scissors, hoses, and shovels they rely on to grow healthy, beautiful, and delicious plants. Below are the twenty-six (26) gardening tools that experienced gardeners use the most. This list of 26 is for harboring your first garden so that you can be equipped throughout the year and make sure you have everything you need.

        You DO NOT need to BUY everything (however, it is recommended) needless to say that having a list that you can refer back to makes life so much easier.

        1. Fiskars Ergo Garden Tool Set

        These are three of the most essential of all gardening tools. And they come packaged together in a convenient, economical set. It includes a garden trowel for excavating shallow holes and trenches, a three-tine cultivator for loosening up hard soil, and a measured transplanting trowel for digging holes to precise depths, which is especially important when planting bulbs.

        Other gardening toolsets to consider buying:

        2. Martha Stewart Hori-Hori Knife

        A great garden knife can handle a lot of chores, from digging to slicing through roots and chopping weeds. A hori-hori is a lightweight tool with a stainless-steel blade and a full tang (that is, the stainless steel extends into the handle so the blade won't bend or break). One edge of the blade is serrated for sawing, and the other is razor-sharp for cutting. It even comes with a leather sheath for storage.

        Other gardening knifes to consider buying:

        3. Magid Glove & Safety Handmaster Rose Pruning Gardening Gloves

        If you’re new to gardening, you might not consider gloves an essential tool, but your hands most certainly will. The gloves are made of synthetic leather that’s puncture-resistant and much more supple and comfortable than animal leather. The elbow-length gauntlet cuff shields your wrists and forearms from injury, and extra padding is provided across the knuckles and fingertips.

        Other gardening gloves to consider buying:

        4. Felco Ergonomic Hand Pruner

        Swiss-made Felco pruners keep your landscape on the cutting edge. The long-lasting steel blade can be re-sharpened or replaced, and other replacement parts are widely available. The pruners make clean, smooth cuts up to one inch in diameter.

        Other gardening hand pruner to consider buying:

        5. Muck Boot Women's Muckster Ii Mid Ankle Boot

        Gardening can quickly wreak havoc on your shoes, and getting a pair of waterproof boots will save you heartache in the long run. A love for gardening can now extend comfortably into the winter with these warm muckster ii designs.

        Other gardening boots to consider buying:

        6. Cate's Garden Hand Weeder

        For tackling a lot of weeding, the least fun but necessary chore of gardening, you'll want this tool that makes it easier. Constructed of an ash wood handle and rust-resistant stainless steel, this hand weeder makes it easy to get weeds on the first try thanks to the V-shaped fork tip and curved base that allows for better leverage.

        Other garden hand weeders to consider buying:

        7. Bully Tools Heavy Duty Sidewalk and Ice Scraper

        In the wintertime, you use an ice chipper to chip away at any ice that builds up on your steps, sidewalk, or driveway. But you can also use the steel chipping head to dig a garden bed by pushing it through the grass and down into the dirt around the perimeter of the square you want to dig. Then you can easily pry the square up to reveal the dirt beneath.

        Other gardening ice chippers to consider buying:

        8. Japanese Hand Garden Hoe

        The Japanese Hand Garden Hoe is sharpened on both sides to make gardening chores quick and easy. This tool removes grass, weeds and works especially well when weeding under mulch.

        Other garden hoe's to consider buying:

        9. Tracey Garden Smart Shovel

        It has a commercial-grade, 14-gauge tempered steel blade and a virtually indestructible fiberglass handle reinforced with steel. But what makes this shovel unique is the built-in soil grater conveniently positioned at the base of the handle.

        Other garden shovels to consider buying:

        10. LEMY Portable Garden Kneeler and Seat

        Your knees will quickly let you know that becoming a gardening aficionado is no joke. There's no way to avoid spending time on the ground when you're tending to your garden, but you may as well be comfortable while you do it. This foldable, padded stool works as both a kneeler and a seat and will quickly become one of your most-loved gardening necessities.

        Other garden kneelers to consider buying:

        11. Gonicc 8” Professional Premium Titanium Bypass Pruning Shears

        A sharp pair of pruners is essential for any gardener. That’s why Truini prefers bypass pruners, which are designed so that the top blade slices past the bottom blade, resulting in very quick, clean cuts. (With anvil pruners, the other common variety, the top blade chomps down onto the bottom blade.) The durable titanium-steel blades on this pair are polished to razor-sharpness and can slice through stalks, branches, and saplings up to three-quarter inch diameter. There’s even a special groove that helps channel away sticky sap that can gum up and stall the pruner.

        Other gardening pruners to consider buying:

        12. Burro Buddy Garden Wheelbarrow Tray

        The Burro Buddy, a garden tray that sits over your wheelbarrow, organizes all your garden tools in one easily-accessible place. It features long-handled tool holders, short-handled tool holders, a drink holder and even a water-resistant compartment to keep your cellphone safe. It prevents you from running back and forth to move items around the garden, so you can focus on what you love best — digging and planting.

        Other tray wheelbarrows to consider buying:

        13. WORX WG050 Aerocart 8-in-1 Yard Cart / Wheelbarrow / Dolly

        The Worx Aerocart is an 8-in-1 all-purpose yard cart, mover and lifter. The Aerocart combines the capabilities of a yard cart, wheelbarrow, hand truck dolly, extended dolly, bag holder, cylinder holder, rock lifter & mover, flower pot carrier, and trailer mover all in one.

        Other yard cart wheelbarrows to consider buying:

        14. Bypass Pruning Shears, Sharp Precision-ground Steel Blade

        Ideal for a variety of pruning tasks: Works well for trimming bonsai tree branches, cutting flower stems, maintaining your herb garden, and more to encourage overall plant health and appearance.

        Other garden sharp precision blades to consider buying:

        15. Gorilla Carts Poly Garden Dump Cart with Steel Frame and 10" Pneumatic Tires, 600-lbs. Capacity

        If your landscape requires heavy-duty labor, a steel cart is a must. This cart carries up to 600 pounds and can easily convert into a flatbed cart with its removable sides. You can even attach the handle to a riding mower or ATV to make gardening and landscaping much less labor-intensive. If your project requires a heavier duty labor, shop for the 1400 lbs dump cart.

        Other gorilla carts to consider buying:

        16. Happy Hydro 60-mm. Trimming Scissors

        These small garden scissors that have very thin, supersharp blades specifically designed for cleanly snipping flower stems, trimming buds, deadheading (the removal of dead flowers), harvesting herbs, and pruning houseplants. They feature Teflon-coated nonstick blades and large, ergonomically designed handles.

        Other gardening scissors to consider buying:

        17. Pruner Pruning Shear with Titanium Coated Curved Precision Blades

        These micro tip snips are built spring-loaded so that they automatically push themselves open without you having to do the work which greatly reduces hand fatigue making these snips great for those with arthritis, carpal tunnel, hand or wrist issues; Comfort Grip handles will make it easy to work for long periods of time without discomfort. These quality snips come with stainless steel precision-sharpened blades which is titanium coated and are ready to tackle all of your deadheading, trimming, and shaping needs for your roses, annuals, vegetable and small flower gardens. With these micro tip snips, you can easily get between plants to "clip and snip" only the area or part that you want to cut with one-hand and without damaging the other vital stems and branches of your other plants.

        Other garden micro curve precision blades to consider buying:

        18. Bloem 2.6-Gallon Watering Can

        A watering can with two handles — one fixed and one hinged — eases the strain on your wrists and helps you give thirsty plants a quick sprinkle or a big gulp. This can has an offset filling hole, so it's easy to fill from a faucet or garden hose. It holds 2.6 gallons and has a rotating spout to help control the flow.

        Other gardening watering cans to consider buying:

        19. Professional EZ Travel Collection Telescopic Folding Garden Rake

        If you’re using a standard leaf rake to smooth soil and clear debris from your garden, you know the frustration of trying to fit it into tight spaces and between narrow rows of plants and vegetables. But this lightweight aluminum-alloy rake features a variable-width head that you can easily adjust from 7 ½ inches to 21 ¾ inches wide. At its widest, it can be used as a standard leaf rake. The telescopic handle is also adjustable — from 37 inches to 68 inches long — to accommodate gardeners of various heights.

        Other garden rakes to consider buying:

        20. Flexzilla Garden Hose

        Just as the sun takes a toll on unprotected skin, it can damage your garden hose, too. Hoses left in the yard eventually become brittle and prone to kinking, so when you try to water your plants, you have to wrestle them back into shape. Flexzilla's hose is made from a hybrid polymer that stays flat and flexible and coils easily for storage.

        Other garden hoses to consider buying:

        21. Green Mount 16” Watering Wand

        This particular wand has a 24-inch curved aluminum shaft that makes it easy to reach over, between, and under closely spaced plants in order to saturate the root zone. Its long-reach design is also ideal for watering overhead hanging.

        Other watering wands to consider buying:

        22. Flantor Garden Irrigation System

        If you’ve got raised beds and want to automate your daily watering. The kit has enough hosing to cover up to 50 feet (ten rows of vegetables) but can also be connected to a second set for use in a bigger space. Every nozzle could be adjusted individually, it can meet the water demand of different plants at one time.

        Other garden irrigation systems to consider:

        23. Garden Apron With Pockets - Heavy Duty Set

        Need an extra hand in the garden? Slip on this combination apron/smock with a pouch that carries small tools, seed packets, work gloves and more. The Garden Apron With Pockets - Heavy Duty Set also holds harvested veggies or pulled weeds. When the bag is full, open it at the bottom and let vegetables slide out onto your table, or dump weeds into the compost pile.

        Other gardening aprons to consider:

        24. 3-in-1 Soil Moisture/Light/pH Tester Gardening Tool Kits for Plant Care

        The flowers and vegetables in your garden depend on high-quality, nutrient-dense soil to grow big and lush. With this simple handheld device, you can quickly monitor the three most important factors in maintaining healthy garden soil: water, sun, and pH value. The three-in-one meter needs no battery and can be used to monitor virtually any plant, including flowers, vegetables, lawns, and even houseplants. Design to be lightweight and portable, easy to carry around for outdoor use, ideal soil test tool kit for home plants, garden, lawn, and farm.

        Other pH Testers to consider buying:

        25. Growsun 2ft 6 Layer Herb Drying Rack Plant Hanging Mesh Dry Net W/Green Zipper

        If you're just getting into gardening, you might not want to spend too much money on all the gadgets available, which is why we love this collapsible hanging rack. You can use it to dry out your freshly grown herbs and veggies to use for cooking or making teas. Durable non-toxic polyester mesh and steel enough to provide sturdy support. It's available in two-, four- and six-tier options.

        Other garden hanging racks to consider buying:

        26. VIVIDMax Grip Clogs

        The go-to unrivaled comfort full slip-on rubber clog shoe that you're sure to feel protected and supported with day after day. You've never seen it! But we VIVIDLY got your back! Shop the max footwear shoe out of your imagination. Be sure to notice 14 traction blocks and 26 ventilations equipped for roughed surfaces.

        Other Garden Equipment

        Top 25 Must Haves Gardening Tools: PDF Download

        Click here to download the PDF First Garden Top 25 Must Haves Essential Gardening Tools Checklist.

        Top 25 Must Haves Gardening Tools: PDF Download

        Click here to download the PDF First Garden Top 25 Must Haves Essential Gardening Tools Checklist.

        Pilgrim Dog Park - The Most Epic Dog Park in the U.S.

        Pilgrim Dog Park - The Most Epic Dog Park in the U.S.

        Your January to December Garden Checklist

        Your January to December Garden Checklist

        Leave comments

        Empty content. Please select article to preview

        MORE FROM OUR BLOG

        The VIVID BLOG

        Everglades National Park Great for Birding by VIVID Magazine Florida. Kayakers and canoeists can float along the Gulf Coast's waters to watch egret...

        Don't make the same mistake I did, Ana Did you know ill-fitting shoes can permanently damage the nerves in your feet? This condition, known as per...

        Okefenokee Wildlife Georgian Cinematic Canoeing Experience To Explore If the cooler weather up north doesn’t sound appealing, consider a trip to Ge...

        Noatak River The Alaskan Cinematic Canoeing Experience To Experience If true isolation is at the top of your list, it doesn’t get much more remote ...

        Green Lakes State Park The Cinematic Canoeing Experience To Experience Green Lakes State Park's outstanding features are its two glacial lakes surr...

        Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie Great for Birdingwatching Magazine Illinois. Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie is located about 60 miles southw...

        Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge Great for Birdingwatching Magazine Washington State. You can spot some beauties flying around here almost any ti...

        Tucson Bird Trail National Park Great for Birdingwatching Magazine This part of Arizona is known for being home to rare bird species that aren't fo...

        Glenwood Caverns Adventure Park The Best Amusement Park in Colorado Glenwood Caverns Adventure Park is located in Glenwood Springs, Colorado and is...

        About Epcot Florida The Best Amusement Park in Florida Epcot is one of Disney World’s theme parks and lets visitors easily travel the world. The pa...

        Dollywood Smoky Mountain The Best Amusement Park in Tennessee This amusement park first opened in 1961 and is situated within Tennessee’s Smoky Mou...

        Disneyland Anaheim Best Amusement Park California Built in 1955, Disneyland was the first of Walt Disney’s famous theme parks. Situated in Anaheim,...

        SELECT YOUR 
        NEWSLETTER CONTENT

        Deciding on which content you'd like to receive and ACTUALLY read?   


        Here's where you can find all the links to ALL OUR Newsletters. We create all of these contents thinking about what we would want + how it would be helpful in our own lives. 

        Whether you're going to a theme park, safari trip, cruise ship or just need some easy and cute checklist sheets, you are guaranteed to find a newsletter you'll like here. Enjoy VIVIDMax Grip Traveler!

        $198
        $168
        image
        You get exclusive access to our style forward, cool clogs Experts who dish their style tips, share trends, give fit advice and more, only in the Vivid Chat.